After a disaster: Lessons in survey methodology from Hurricane Katrina

Tammy L. Henderson, Maria Sirois, Angela Chen, Christopher Airriess, David A. Swanson, David Banks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2005, the National Science Foundation funded a number of projects to study the impact of Hurricane Katrina. The current article provides an overview of several research approaches used to conduct post-Katrina research. Each method had some advantages and disadvantages. The post-disaster context meant that experience from traditional survey methods often did not apply. Comparisons of advantages and disadvantages associated with each sampling method serve to inform future post-disaster research and illuminate the limits of classical research methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-92
Number of pages26
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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hurricane
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research approach
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survey method
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experience
sampling
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comparison
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Keywords

  • Convenience sampling
  • Disaster research
  • Long-form sample survey
  • Purposive sampling
  • Short-form enumeration
  • Stratified random sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

After a disaster : Lessons in survey methodology from Hurricane Katrina. / Henderson, Tammy L.; Sirois, Maria; Chen, Angela; Airriess, Christopher; Swanson, David A.; Banks, David.

In: Population Research and Policy Review, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2009, p. 67-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henderson, Tammy L. ; Sirois, Maria ; Chen, Angela ; Airriess, Christopher ; Swanson, David A. ; Banks, David. / After a disaster : Lessons in survey methodology from Hurricane Katrina. In: Population Research and Policy Review. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 67-92.
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