African-American renal transplant recipients experience decreased risk of death due to infection: Possible implications for immunosuppressive strategies

Herwig Ulf Meier-Kriesche, Akinlolu Ojo, John C. Magee, Diane M. Cibrik, Julie A. Hanson, Alan B. Leichtman, Bruce Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: African-American renal transplant recipients tend to experience more acute rejection episodes and have shorter graft survival than Caucasian renal transplant recipients. Various factors have been posited to be responsible for this difference, including relative under immunosuppression. We reasoned that by looking at the balance of acute rejections versus death due to infection, we could ascertain whether African- American renal recipients might have more reserve to tolerate an increase in pharmacological immunosuppression. Methods. We analyzed the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) data from 1987 to 1997 regarding acute rejection episodes and infectious deaths. All other pertinent factors were gathered for a multivariate analysis. A total number of 68,885 adult renal transplant recipients were analyzed. Results. When corrected for all covariates, the relative risk for acute rejection (1.3) was higher although the relative risk for infectious death was lower (0.7) in African-Americans as compared with Caucasians (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-379
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 27 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Immunosuppressive Agents
African Americans
Kidney
Infection
Immunosuppression
Graft Survival
Information Systems
Multivariate Analysis
Transplant Recipients
Pharmacology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Meier-Kriesche, H. U., Ojo, A., Magee, J. C., Cibrik, D. M., Hanson, J. A., Leichtman, A. B., & Kaplan, B. (2000). African-American renal transplant recipients experience decreased risk of death due to infection: Possible implications for immunosuppressive strategies. Transplantation, 70(2), 375-379.

African-American renal transplant recipients experience decreased risk of death due to infection : Possible implications for immunosuppressive strategies. / Meier-Kriesche, Herwig Ulf; Ojo, Akinlolu; Magee, John C.; Cibrik, Diane M.; Hanson, Julie A.; Leichtman, Alan B.; Kaplan, Bruce.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 70, No. 2, 27.07.2000, p. 375-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meier-Kriesche, HU, Ojo, A, Magee, JC, Cibrik, DM, Hanson, JA, Leichtman, AB & Kaplan, B 2000, 'African-American renal transplant recipients experience decreased risk of death due to infection: Possible implications for immunosuppressive strategies', Transplantation, vol. 70, no. 2, pp. 375-379.
Meier-Kriesche, Herwig Ulf ; Ojo, Akinlolu ; Magee, John C. ; Cibrik, Diane M. ; Hanson, Julie A. ; Leichtman, Alan B. ; Kaplan, Bruce. / African-American renal transplant recipients experience decreased risk of death due to infection : Possible implications for immunosuppressive strategies. In: Transplantation. 2000 ; Vol. 70, No. 2. pp. 375-379.
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AU - Hanson, Julie A.

AU - Leichtman, Alan B.

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