Affiliation with substance-using peers: Examining gene-environment correlations among parent monitoring, polygenic risk, and children's impulsivity

Kit Elam, Laurie Chassin, Kathryn Lemery, Danielle Pandika, Frances L. Wang, Kaitlin Bountress, Danielle Dick, Arpana Agrawal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parental monitoring can buffer the effect of deviant peers on adolescents’ substance use by reducing affiliation with substance-using peers. However, children's genetic predispositions may evoke poorer monitoring, contributing to negative child outcomes. We examined evocative genotype-environment correlations underlying children's genetic predisposition for behavioral undercontrol and parental monitoring in early adolescence via children's impulsivity in middle childhood, and the influence of parental monitoring on affiliation with substance-using peers a year and a half later (n = 359). Genetic predisposition for behavioral undercontrol was captured using a polygenic risk score, and a portion of passive rGE was controlled by including parents’ polygenic risk scores. Children's polygenic risk predicted poorer parental monitoring via greater children's impulsivity, indicating evocative rGE, controlling for a portion of passive rGE. Poorer parental monitoring predicted greater children's affiliation with substance-using peers a year and a half later. Results are discussed with respect to gene-environment correlations within developmental cascades.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-573
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Impulsive Behavior
Genes
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Buffers
Parents
Genotype

Keywords

  • deviant peers
  • gene-environment correlation
  • impulsivity
  • parent monitoring
  • polygenic risk score

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Affiliation with substance-using peers : Examining gene-environment correlations among parent monitoring, polygenic risk, and children's impulsivity. / Elam, Kit; Chassin, Laurie; Lemery, Kathryn; Pandika, Danielle; Wang, Frances L.; Bountress, Kaitlin; Dick, Danielle; Agrawal, Arpana.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.07.2017, p. 561-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elam, Kit ; Chassin, Laurie ; Lemery, Kathryn ; Pandika, Danielle ; Wang, Frances L. ; Bountress, Kaitlin ; Dick, Danielle ; Agrawal, Arpana. / Affiliation with substance-using peers : Examining gene-environment correlations among parent monitoring, polygenic risk, and children's impulsivity. In: Developmental Psychobiology. 2017 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 561-573.
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