Affection mediates the impact of alexithymia on relationships

Colin Hesse, Kory Floyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has shown alexithymia leading to a deficit in the ability of an individual to build and maintain relationships. Using the tenets of Affection Exchange Theory, the current study hypothesized a mediating role of trait affection in the relationship between alexithymia and both attachment behavior (specifically, anxious/avoidant and the need for intimacy) and an individual's self-reported number of close relationships. Participants (N= 921) filled out self-report measures of all variables, and the hypotheses were tested using a path analysis. Findings largely supported the predictions, with affection partially mediating the relationship between alexithymia and anxious/avoidant attachment and fully mediating the relationship between alexithymia and the need for intimacy and the number of close relationships. One sex interaction was also found, with the relationship between alexithymia and the need for intimacy becoming significantly stronger for women than for men. Implications and directions for future research are explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-456
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

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Affective Symptoms
Aptitude
Self Report
Research

Keywords

  • Affection
  • Alexithymia
  • Attachment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Affection mediates the impact of alexithymia on relationships. / Hesse, Colin; Floyd, Kory.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 50, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 451-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hesse, Colin ; Floyd, Kory. / Affection mediates the impact of alexithymia on relationships. In: Personality and Individual Differences. 2011 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 451-456.
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