Adolescents’ willingness to vote for a woman for president

The effect of gender and race

Cassia Spohn, Diane Gillespie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the past two decades there has been an increase in the number of women who campaign for and attain political office. This clearly has the potential to influence attitudes toward women in politics. In particular, it has the potential to influence the attitudes of adolescents, who, according to socialization theory, are especially affected by role models. In this study we used a quasiexperimental design to examine adolescents' attitudes toward female political candidates. We found that the junior and senior high school students we surveyed did not, as a group, use candidate sex as a voting cue. However, females were more willing than males and blacks were more willing than whites to vote for the female candidate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-50
Number of pages20
JournalWomen and Politics
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

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voter
president
candidacy
adolescent
gender
socialization theory
role model
voting
campaign
politics
school
Group
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Adolescents’ willingness to vote for a woman for president : The effect of gender and race. / Spohn, Cassia; Gillespie, Diane.

In: Women and Politics, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.12.1987, p. 31-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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