Adolescents' resilience as a self-regulatory process

Promising themes for linking intervention with developmental science

Thomas J. Dishion, Arin Connell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the concept of self-regulation as a measure of resilience in children and adolescents. Developmental psychology and neuroscience are converging on the role of attention control as a central ability underlying self-regulation. We collected measures of adolescent attention control from parents and youth, and a measure of self-regulation from teachers. The measures of effortful attention correlated highly with teacher ratings of self-regulation. The composite measure of self-regulation (youth, parent, teacher report) was found to moderate the impact of peer deviance on adolescent antisocial behavior, as well as stress on adolescent depression. These findings suggest that self-regulation is a promising index of adolescent resilience. The construct of self-regulation also provides an excellent target for strategies aimed to improve child and adolescent adjustment in problematic environments and stressful circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages125-138
Number of pages14
Volume1094
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1094
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Composite materials
Social Adjustment
Adolescent Behavior
Aptitude
Neurosciences
Self-Control
Parents
Depression
Developmental Psychology

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Antisocial behavior
  • Depression
  • Resilience
  • Self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Dishion, T. J., & Connell, A. (2006). Adolescents' resilience as a self-regulatory process: Promising themes for linking intervention with developmental science. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1094, pp. 125-138). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1094). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1376.012

Adolescents' resilience as a self-regulatory process : Promising themes for linking intervention with developmental science. / Dishion, Thomas J.; Connell, Arin.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1094 2006. p. 125-138 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1094).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dishion, TJ & Connell, A 2006, Adolescents' resilience as a self-regulatory process: Promising themes for linking intervention with developmental science. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1094, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1094, pp. 125-138. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1376.012
Dishion TJ, Connell A. Adolescents' resilience as a self-regulatory process: Promising themes for linking intervention with developmental science. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1094. 2006. p. 125-138. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1376.012
Dishion, Thomas J. ; Connell, Arin. / Adolescents' resilience as a self-regulatory process : Promising themes for linking intervention with developmental science. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1094 2006. pp. 125-138 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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