Addressing fear of crime in public space: Gender differences in reaction to safety measures in train transit

Nilay Yavuz, Eric Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has identified several factors that affect fear of crime in public space. However, the extent to which gender moderates the effectiveness of fear-reducing measures has received little attention. Using data from the Chicago Transit Authority Customer Satisfaction Survey of 2003, this study aims to understand whether train transit security practices and service attributes affect men and women differently. Findings indicate that, while the presence of video cameras has a lower effect on women's feelings of safety compared with men, frequent and on-time service matters more to male passengers. Additionally, experience with safety-related problems affects women significantly more than men. Conclusions discuss the implications of the study for theory and gender-specific policies to improve perceptions of transit safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2491-2515
Number of pages25
JournalUrban Studies
Volume47
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

public space
crime
train
gender-specific factors
gender
offense
safety
anxiety
transit authority
customer
video
safety measure
woman
experience
services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Addressing fear of crime in public space : Gender differences in reaction to safety measures in train transit. / Yavuz, Nilay; Welch, Eric.

In: Urban Studies, Vol. 47, No. 12, 2010, p. 2491-2515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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