Addressing college drinking through curriculum infusion: A study of the use of experience-based learning in the communication classroom

Linda Lederman, Lea P. Stewart, Travis L. Russ

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether the use of a norms-based simulation in a communication class can influence students' misperceptions about college drinking. Participants (N=462) were enrolled in two undergraduate communication courses: one in which the simulation was used and another that served as a control. Results indicated that participating in the simulation resulted in a decrease in beliefs about college drinking myths; moreover, students' perceptions of social drinking norms were related to their actual drinking behaviors. Findings indicated that the campus atmosphere and social networks promoted alcohol consumption. Results support using a norms-based simulation to provide information about dangerous drinking behaviors while at the same time teaching relevant communication principles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-494
Number of pages19
JournalCommunication Education
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

Keywords

  • College drinking
  • Curriculum infusion
  • Social norms
  • Socially situated experiential learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics

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