Addition of an approach to a swimming relay start

S. P. McLean, M. J. Holthe, P. F. Vint, K. D. Beckett, R. N. Hinrichs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten male collegiate swimmers (age = 20.2 ± 1.4 years, height = 184.6 ± 5.8 cm, mass = 82.9 ± 9.3 kg) performed 3 swimming relay step starts, which incorporated a one or two-step approach, and a no-step relay start. Time to 10 m was not significantly shorter between step and no-step starts. A double-step start increased horizontal takeoff velocity by 0.2 m/s. A single-step together start decreased vertical takeoff velocity by 0.2 m/s but increased takeoff height by 0.16 m. Subjects were more upright at takeoff by 4°, 2°, and 5° in the double-step, single-step apart, and single-step together starts respectively, than in the no-step start. Entry angle was steeper by 2°, entry orientation was steeper by 3°, and entry vertical velocity was faster by 0.3 m/s in the single-step together start. Restricting step length by 50% had little effect on step starts with the exceptions that horizontal velocity was significantly reduced by 0.1 m/s in the double-step start and vertical takeoff velocity was increased by 0.2 m/s in the single-step together start. These data suggested that step starts offered some performance improvements over the no-step start, but these improvements were not widespread and, in the case of the double-step start, were dependent on the ability to take longer steps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-355
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume16
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Projectile motion
  • Relay starts
  • Swimming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

McLean, S. P., Holthe, M. J., Vint, P. F., Beckett, K. D., & Hinrichs, R. N. (2000). Addition of an approach to a swimming relay start. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 16(4), 342-355.

Addition of an approach to a swimming relay start. / McLean, S. P.; Holthe, M. J.; Vint, P. F.; Beckett, K. D.; Hinrichs, R. N.

In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics, Vol. 16, No. 4, 2000, p. 342-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McLean, SP, Holthe, MJ, Vint, PF, Beckett, KD & Hinrichs, RN 2000, 'Addition of an approach to a swimming relay start', Journal of Applied Biomechanics, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 342-355.
McLean SP, Holthe MJ, Vint PF, Beckett KD, Hinrichs RN. Addition of an approach to a swimming relay start. Journal of Applied Biomechanics. 2000;16(4):342-355.
McLean, S. P. ; Holthe, M. J. ; Vint, P. F. ; Beckett, K. D. ; Hinrichs, R. N. / Addition of an approach to a swimming relay start. In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics. 2000 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 342-355.
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