Adaptive distance metrie learning for clustering

Jieping Ye, Zheng Zhao, Huan Liu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

A good distance metric is crucial for unsupervised learning from high-dimensional data. To learn a metric without any constraint or class label information, most unsupervised metric learning algorithms appeal to projecting observed data onto a low-dimensional manifold, where geometric relationships such as local or global pairwise distances are preserved. However, the projection may not necessarily improve the separability of the data, which is the desirable outcome of clustering. In this paper, we propose a novel unsupervised adaptive Metric Learning algorithm, called AML, which performs clustering and distance metric learning simultaneously. AML projects the data onto a low-dimensional manifold, where the separability of the data is maximized. We show that the joint clustering and distance metric learning can be formulated as a trace maximization problem, which can be solved via an iterative procedure in the EM framework. Experimental results on a collection of benchmark data sets demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR'07
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event2007 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR'07 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2007Jun 22 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
ISSN (Print)1063-6919

Other

Other2007 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR'07
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period6/17/076/22/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

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