Adaptation of human oscillometric blood pressure monitors for use in dogs.

J. S. Hunter, C. J. McGrath, C. D. Thatcher, R. L. Remillard, W. C. McCain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two digital oscillometric human blood pressure measuring devices were modified and evaluated as blood pressure monitors in 12 healthy anesthetized dogs. Direct arterial pressures were measured via cannulation of the dorsal pedal artery and were correlated with indirect measurements through an inflatable cuff placed over the dorsal pedal artery below the hock joint of the contralateral limb. Direct and indirect measurements were compared for systolic, diastolic, and calculated mean arterial pressures. Blood pressure ranges between 215/145 mm of Hg and 65/30 mm of Hg were obtained, using combinations of halothane, phenylephrine, calcium, and IV administered fluids. Machine A was found to be insufficient for clinical application, on the basis of correlation coefficients between direct and indirect pressures of 0.78, 0.65, and 0.74 for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures, respectively. Higher correlation coefficients between direct and indirect pressures (0.77, 0.87, and 0.87, respectively) were obtained with machine B. The results of the study reported here suggest machine B may be an effective blood pressure monitoring device in anesthetized dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1439-1442
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume51
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adaptation of human oscillometric blood pressure monitors for use in dogs.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Hunter, J. S., McGrath, C. J., Thatcher, C. D., Remillard, R. L., & McCain, W. C. (1990). Adaptation of human oscillometric blood pressure monitors for use in dogs. American journal of veterinary research, 51(9), 1439-1442.