Ad libitum fluid intake does not prevent dehydration in suboptimally hydrated young soccer players during a training session of a summer camp

Giannis Arnaoutis, Stavros A. Kavouras, Yiannis P. Kotsis, Yiannis E. Tsekouras, Michalis Makrillos, Costas N. Bardis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a lack of studies concerning hydration status of young athletes exercising in the heat. Purpose: To assess preexercise hydration status in young soccer players during a summer sports camp and to evaluate bodywater balance after soccer training sessions. Methods: Initial hydration status was assessed in 107 young male soccer players (age 11-16 yr) during the 2nd day of the camp. Seventy-two athletes agreed to be monitored during 2 more training sessions (3rd and 5th days of the camp) to calculate dehydration via changes in body weight, while water drinking was allowed ad libitum. Hydration status was assessed via urine specific gravity (USG), urine color, and changes in total body weight. Mean environmental temperature and humidity were 27.2 ± 2 °C and 57% ± 9%, respectively. Results: According to USG values, 95 of 107 of the players were hypohydrated (USG ≥ 1.020) before practice. The prevalence of dehydration observed was maintained on both days, with 95.8% and 97.2% of the players being dehydrated after the training sessions on the 3rd and 5th days, respectively. Despite fluid availability, 54 of the 66 (81.8%) dehydrated players reduced their body weight (-0.35 ± 0.04 kg) as a response to training, while 74.6% (47 out of the 63) further reduced their body weight (-0.22 ± 0.03 kg) after training on the 5th day. Conclusion: Approximately 90% of the young soccer players who began exercising under warm weather conditions were hypohydrated, while drinking ad libitum during practice did not prevent further dehydration in already dehydrated players.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-251
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Soccer
Dehydration
Specific Gravity
Urine
Body Weight
Athletes
Body Weight Changes
Weather
Humidity
Drinking Water
Drinking
Sports
Color
Hot Temperature
Temperature

Keywords

  • Children
  • Exercise
  • Fluid balance
  • Hydration status
  • Thirst

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Ad libitum fluid intake does not prevent dehydration in suboptimally hydrated young soccer players during a training session of a summer camp. / Arnaoutis, Giannis; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Kotsis, Yiannis P.; Tsekouras, Yiannis E.; Makrillos, Michalis; Bardis, Costas N.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Vol. 23, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 245-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1dc9ddd0017c4811b1bca1c8dba1e8a0,
title = "Ad libitum fluid intake does not prevent dehydration in suboptimally hydrated young soccer players during a training session of a summer camp",
abstract = "There is a lack of studies concerning hydration status of young athletes exercising in the heat. Purpose: To assess preexercise hydration status in young soccer players during a summer sports camp and to evaluate bodywater balance after soccer training sessions. Methods: Initial hydration status was assessed in 107 young male soccer players (age 11-16 yr) during the 2nd day of the camp. Seventy-two athletes agreed to be monitored during 2 more training sessions (3rd and 5th days of the camp) to calculate dehydration via changes in body weight, while water drinking was allowed ad libitum. Hydration status was assessed via urine specific gravity (USG), urine color, and changes in total body weight. Mean environmental temperature and humidity were 27.2 ± 2 °C and 57{\%} ± 9{\%}, respectively. Results: According to USG values, 95 of 107 of the players were hypohydrated (USG ≥ 1.020) before practice. The prevalence of dehydration observed was maintained on both days, with 95.8{\%} and 97.2{\%} of the players being dehydrated after the training sessions on the 3rd and 5th days, respectively. Despite fluid availability, 54 of the 66 (81.8{\%}) dehydrated players reduced their body weight (-0.35 ± 0.04 kg) as a response to training, while 74.6{\%} (47 out of the 63) further reduced their body weight (-0.22 ± 0.03 kg) after training on the 5th day. Conclusion: Approximately 90{\%} of the young soccer players who began exercising under warm weather conditions were hypohydrated, while drinking ad libitum during practice did not prevent further dehydration in already dehydrated players.",
keywords = "Children, Exercise, Fluid balance, Hydration status, Thirst",
author = "Giannis Arnaoutis and Kavouras, {Stavros A.} and Kotsis, {Yiannis P.} and Tsekouras, {Yiannis E.} and Michalis Makrillos and Bardis, {Costas N.}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1123/ijsnem.23.3.245",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "245--251",
journal = "International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism",
issn = "1526-484X",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ad libitum fluid intake does not prevent dehydration in suboptimally hydrated young soccer players during a training session of a summer camp

AU - Arnaoutis, Giannis

AU - Kavouras, Stavros A.

AU - Kotsis, Yiannis P.

AU - Tsekouras, Yiannis E.

AU - Makrillos, Michalis

AU - Bardis, Costas N.

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - There is a lack of studies concerning hydration status of young athletes exercising in the heat. Purpose: To assess preexercise hydration status in young soccer players during a summer sports camp and to evaluate bodywater balance after soccer training sessions. Methods: Initial hydration status was assessed in 107 young male soccer players (age 11-16 yr) during the 2nd day of the camp. Seventy-two athletes agreed to be monitored during 2 more training sessions (3rd and 5th days of the camp) to calculate dehydration via changes in body weight, while water drinking was allowed ad libitum. Hydration status was assessed via urine specific gravity (USG), urine color, and changes in total body weight. Mean environmental temperature and humidity were 27.2 ± 2 °C and 57% ± 9%, respectively. Results: According to USG values, 95 of 107 of the players were hypohydrated (USG ≥ 1.020) before practice. The prevalence of dehydration observed was maintained on both days, with 95.8% and 97.2% of the players being dehydrated after the training sessions on the 3rd and 5th days, respectively. Despite fluid availability, 54 of the 66 (81.8%) dehydrated players reduced their body weight (-0.35 ± 0.04 kg) as a response to training, while 74.6% (47 out of the 63) further reduced their body weight (-0.22 ± 0.03 kg) after training on the 5th day. Conclusion: Approximately 90% of the young soccer players who began exercising under warm weather conditions were hypohydrated, while drinking ad libitum during practice did not prevent further dehydration in already dehydrated players.

AB - There is a lack of studies concerning hydration status of young athletes exercising in the heat. Purpose: To assess preexercise hydration status in young soccer players during a summer sports camp and to evaluate bodywater balance after soccer training sessions. Methods: Initial hydration status was assessed in 107 young male soccer players (age 11-16 yr) during the 2nd day of the camp. Seventy-two athletes agreed to be monitored during 2 more training sessions (3rd and 5th days of the camp) to calculate dehydration via changes in body weight, while water drinking was allowed ad libitum. Hydration status was assessed via urine specific gravity (USG), urine color, and changes in total body weight. Mean environmental temperature and humidity were 27.2 ± 2 °C and 57% ± 9%, respectively. Results: According to USG values, 95 of 107 of the players were hypohydrated (USG ≥ 1.020) before practice. The prevalence of dehydration observed was maintained on both days, with 95.8% and 97.2% of the players being dehydrated after the training sessions on the 3rd and 5th days, respectively. Despite fluid availability, 54 of the 66 (81.8%) dehydrated players reduced their body weight (-0.35 ± 0.04 kg) as a response to training, while 74.6% (47 out of the 63) further reduced their body weight (-0.22 ± 0.03 kg) after training on the 5th day. Conclusion: Approximately 90% of the young soccer players who began exercising under warm weather conditions were hypohydrated, while drinking ad libitum during practice did not prevent further dehydration in already dehydrated players.

KW - Children

KW - Exercise

KW - Fluid balance

KW - Hydration status

KW - Thirst

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878942942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84878942942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/ijsnem.23.3.245

DO - 10.1123/ijsnem.23.3.245

M3 - Article

C2 - 23166200

AN - SCOPUS:84878942942

VL - 23

SP - 245

EP - 251

JO - International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

JF - International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

SN - 1526-484X

IS - 3

ER -