Acute bouts of assisted cycling improves cognitive and upper extremity movement functions in adolescents with down syndrome

Shannon Ringenbach, Andrew R. Albert, Chih Chia Chen, Jay L. Alberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of 2 modes of exercise on cognitive and upper extremity movement functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Nine participants randomly completed 3 interventions over 3 consecutive weeks. The interventions were: (a) voluntary cycling (VC), in which participants cycled at their self-selected pedaling rate; (b) assisted cycling (AC), in which the participants' voluntary pedaling rates were augmented with a motor to ensure the maintenance of 80 rpm; and (c) no cycling (NC), in which the participants sat and listened to music. Manual dexterity improved after AC, but not after VC or NC. Measures of cognitive function, including reaction time and cognitive planning, also improved after AC, but not after the other interventions. Future research will try to uncover the mechanisms involved in the behavioral improvements found after an acute bout of assisted cycling in adolescents with DS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-135
Number of pages12
JournalIntellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Cycling
  • Down syndrome
  • Executive function
  • Exercise
  • Intellectual disability
  • Physical activity
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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