Activity, event transactions, and quality of life in older adults.

J. W. Reich, A. J. Zautra, J. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multidimensional assessment of activity and subjective well-being based on a cognitive model of event causation was tested in a sample of 60 older adults. Activity was conceptualized as involving the occurrence of an event, the presence or absence of a response to that event, and the hedonic tone of the outcome of that transaction. Events were categorized as to whether the environment or the individual initiated them: demands or desires, respectively. Well-being was conceptualized as having two independent components, positive and negative, assessed by positive and negative mood scales and general well-being and quality-of-life scales. Analyses showed that older adults who were responsive to events reported more positive well-being, but high responding was also associated with negative aspects of well-being. Demands interacted with desire responding and outcome; affective outcomes of desired actions were significantly influenced by the occurrence of demand events. Results are interpreted in an expanded model of activity theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-124
Number of pages9
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume2
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1987

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Pleasure
Causality
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Reich, J. W., Zautra, A. J., & Hill, J. (1987). Activity, event transactions, and quality of life in older adults. Psychology and Aging, 2(2), 116-124.

Activity, event transactions, and quality of life in older adults. / Reich, J. W.; Zautra, A. J.; Hill, J.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 2, No. 2, 06.1987, p. 116-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reich, JW, Zautra, AJ & Hill, J 1987, 'Activity, event transactions, and quality of life in older adults.', Psychology and Aging, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 116-124.
Reich, J. W. ; Zautra, A. J. ; Hill, J. / Activity, event transactions, and quality of life in older adults. In: Psychology and Aging. 1987 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 116-124.
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