Accuracy and performance of fluid-structure interaction algorithms with explicit versus implicit formulations of the fluid solver

Yi Qin Xu, Yulia Peet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Fluid structure interaction (FSI) describes a problem when a solid structure deforms or oscillates by the in uence of the fluid flow, and thus a two-way interaction occur, such as in wind turbines, airfoils, parachutes, biological systems, including aneurysms, etc. One of the major challenges in the numerical simulation of this problem is the computational cost, and most of the current solvers are using an implicit method for fluid, with Newton-Raphson method being the most popular. However, an explicit method is relatively cheap. In this paper, explicit method with sub-iterations is compared with a Newton-Raphson method through an FSI benchmark case. We concentrate on comparison of accuracy as well as the computational performance of the two methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication23rd AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 2017
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA
ISBN (Print)9781624105067
StatePublished - 2017
Event23rd AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 2017 - Denver, United States
Duration: Jun 5 2017Jun 9 2017

Other

Other23rd AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period6/5/176/9/17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Aerospace Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Xu, Y. Q., & Peet, Y. (2017). Accuracy and performance of fluid-structure interaction algorithms with explicit versus implicit formulations of the fluid solver. In 23rd AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, 2017 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA.