Acculturation status and hiv/aids knowledge and perception of risk among a group of mexican american middle school students

Flavio Marsiglia, Rudy Navarro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article explores relationships between acculturation status, HIV/AIDS knowledge, and perceived risk of HIV infection among a selected group of Mexican American youth from a large Southwestern city. The vulnerability, risk and resiliency model served as the theoretical framework for the research. Students exhibiting lower acculturation levels were significantly less knowledgeable about HIV/AIDS and felt at a significantly higher risk for HIV infection than their more acculturated classmates. Lower acculturation had a temporary resiliency effect on the female students. The implications of these findings for future research, policy development, prevention programs and social work practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-61
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Education for Adolescents and Children
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 4 2000

Keywords

  • Acculturation status
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Mexican Americans
  • Middle schools

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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