Acculturation of second- and third-generation mexican american children: Field Independence, Locus of Control, Self-Esteem, and School Achievement

George P. Knight, Spencer Kagan, William Nelson, Jann Gumbiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Measures of field independence, locus of control, self-esteem, and school achievement were obtained for 144 Anglo American and Mexican American fourth, fifth, and sixth grade children from a “traditional” Mexican American community. From second to third generation, Mexican American children increasingly approach Anglo American norms with respect to field independence, reading achievement, and math achievement. Opposite trends were obtained with regard to self-esteem; no significant effects of generational level were found with regard to locus of control. Several possible explanations of the apparent paradox of decreasing self-esteem alongside increasing achievement levels with generation are suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-97
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

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