Academic Stress of Native American Undergraduates: The Role of Ethnic Identity, Cultural Congruity, and Self-Beliefs

Christine L. Chee, Gerald Shorty, Sharon Kurpius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Little empirical attention has been given to the academic stress experienced by Native American undergraduates. This study explored the relation of self-beliefs, ethnic identity, and cultural congruity with academic stress among 158 (65 males and 93 females) Native American university undergraduates. Participants completed instruments assessing self-esteem, academic self-efficacy (grade and task), ethnic identity (centrality, public regard, and private regard), cultural congruity, and academic stress. Hierarchical regressions revealed that self-beliefs (specifically task self-efficacy), ethnic identity (particularly public regard), and cultural congruity predicted academic stress, accounting for 23.7% of the variance. Each of these constructs was negatively related to academic stress. These findings are discussed in light of the literature, and ideas for college-based interventions are given.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Diversity in Higher Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 17 2018

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ethnic identity
self-efficacy
self-esteem
regression
university

Keywords

  • Academic stress
  • Cultural congruity
  • Ethnic identity
  • Native Americans
  • Self-beliefs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

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abstract = "Little empirical attention has been given to the academic stress experienced by Native American undergraduates. This study explored the relation of self-beliefs, ethnic identity, and cultural congruity with academic stress among 158 (65 males and 93 females) Native American university undergraduates. Participants completed instruments assessing self-esteem, academic self-efficacy (grade and task), ethnic identity (centrality, public regard, and private regard), cultural congruity, and academic stress. Hierarchical regressions revealed that self-beliefs (specifically task self-efficacy), ethnic identity (particularly public regard), and cultural congruity predicted academic stress, accounting for 23.7{\%} of the variance. Each of these constructs was negatively related to academic stress. These findings are discussed in light of the literature, and ideas for college-based interventions are given.",
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