Academic self-esteem and perceived validity of grades: A test of self-verification theory

Morris A. Okun, Lee M. Fournet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypothesis derived from self-verification theory that semester GPA would be (a) positively related to perceived validity of grades scores among high academic self-esteem college students and (b) inversely related to perceived validity of grades scores among low academic self-esteem college students was tested. Subjects were 281 undergraduates enrolled in an introductory psychology course at a large state university. A multiple regression analysis indicated that semester GPA and academic self-esteem exerted a joint effect on perceived validity of grades scores (net R2 =.04). Contrary to our prediction, simple slope analyses indicated that the slope for semester GPA was positive for low and high academic self-esteem students alike, although the slope was steeper for high relative to low academic self-esteem students. Several possible boundary conditions on self-verification effects are discussed related to the extremity, globality, and subjectivity of positive feedback provided to low self-esteem individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)414-426
Number of pages13
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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