A Within-Person Analysis of the Association between Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Use in Adolescents

Sophie A. Lazarus, Jordan Beardslee, Sarah L. Pedersen, Stephanie D. Stepp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many studies examining the association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and alcohol use during adolescence have focused on between-individual differences (rank order stability), comparing whether adolescents with elevated rates of alcohol use have higher BPD symptoms than those with lower rates of alcohol use. As such, the extent to which an individual’s alcohol use is associated with concurrent and future BPD symptoms has been relatively unstudied. The current study assessed year-to-year fluctuations in alcohol use and BPD symptoms in a large urban sample of girls from age 14 to age 17 (N = 2450). The primary aim was to examine whether increases in alcohol use were associated with increases in adolescent girls’ BPD symptoms in the same year and in the following year. Results of fixed-effects (within-individual) models revealed that even while controlling for the time-varying impact of symptoms of both internalizing and externalizing disorders, prior and concurrent other substance use, and all time invariant, pre-existing differences between individuals, higher past-year alcohol use was associated with higher levels of BPD symptoms. Furthermore, this association did not vary by age, or by sociodemographic factors, including child race and socioeconomic status of the family. The results of this study indicate heightened risk for the exacerbation of BPD symptoms following increases in alcohol use frequency and highlight the potential utility of interventions targeting drinking behavior for preventing escalations in BPD symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1157-1167
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Borderline Personality Disorder
Alcohols
Individuality
Drinking Behavior
Underage Drinking
Social Class

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol use
  • Borderline personality disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A Within-Person Analysis of the Association between Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Use in Adolescents. / Lazarus, Sophie A.; Beardslee, Jordan; Pedersen, Sarah L.; Stepp, Stephanie D.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 45, No. 6, 01.08.2017, p. 1157-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{646e3258ea564edda78594abe1b4c3ac,
title = "A Within-Person Analysis of the Association between Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Use in Adolescents",
abstract = "Many studies examining the association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and alcohol use during adolescence have focused on between-individual differences (rank order stability), comparing whether adolescents with elevated rates of alcohol use have higher BPD symptoms than those with lower rates of alcohol use. As such, the extent to which an individual’s alcohol use is associated with concurrent and future BPD symptoms has been relatively unstudied. The current study assessed year-to-year fluctuations in alcohol use and BPD symptoms in a large urban sample of girls from age 14 to age 17 (N = 2450). The primary aim was to examine whether increases in alcohol use were associated with increases in adolescent girls’ BPD symptoms in the same year and in the following year. Results of fixed-effects (within-individual) models revealed that even while controlling for the time-varying impact of symptoms of both internalizing and externalizing disorders, prior and concurrent other substance use, and all time invariant, pre-existing differences between individuals, higher past-year alcohol use was associated with higher levels of BPD symptoms. Furthermore, this association did not vary by age, or by sociodemographic factors, including child race and socioeconomic status of the family. The results of this study indicate heightened risk for the exacerbation of BPD symptoms following increases in alcohol use frequency and highlight the potential utility of interventions targeting drinking behavior for preventing escalations in BPD symptoms.",
keywords = "Adolescence, Alcohol use, Borderline personality disorder",
author = "Lazarus, {Sophie A.} and Jordan Beardslee and Pedersen, {Sarah L.} and Stepp, {Stephanie D.}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10802-016-0225-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "1157--1167",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology",
issn = "0091-0627",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Within-Person Analysis of the Association between Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Use in Adolescents

AU - Lazarus, Sophie A.

AU - Beardslee, Jordan

AU - Pedersen, Sarah L.

AU - Stepp, Stephanie D.

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Many studies examining the association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and alcohol use during adolescence have focused on between-individual differences (rank order stability), comparing whether adolescents with elevated rates of alcohol use have higher BPD symptoms than those with lower rates of alcohol use. As such, the extent to which an individual’s alcohol use is associated with concurrent and future BPD symptoms has been relatively unstudied. The current study assessed year-to-year fluctuations in alcohol use and BPD symptoms in a large urban sample of girls from age 14 to age 17 (N = 2450). The primary aim was to examine whether increases in alcohol use were associated with increases in adolescent girls’ BPD symptoms in the same year and in the following year. Results of fixed-effects (within-individual) models revealed that even while controlling for the time-varying impact of symptoms of both internalizing and externalizing disorders, prior and concurrent other substance use, and all time invariant, pre-existing differences between individuals, higher past-year alcohol use was associated with higher levels of BPD symptoms. Furthermore, this association did not vary by age, or by sociodemographic factors, including child race and socioeconomic status of the family. The results of this study indicate heightened risk for the exacerbation of BPD symptoms following increases in alcohol use frequency and highlight the potential utility of interventions targeting drinking behavior for preventing escalations in BPD symptoms.

AB - Many studies examining the association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and alcohol use during adolescence have focused on between-individual differences (rank order stability), comparing whether adolescents with elevated rates of alcohol use have higher BPD symptoms than those with lower rates of alcohol use. As such, the extent to which an individual’s alcohol use is associated with concurrent and future BPD symptoms has been relatively unstudied. The current study assessed year-to-year fluctuations in alcohol use and BPD symptoms in a large urban sample of girls from age 14 to age 17 (N = 2450). The primary aim was to examine whether increases in alcohol use were associated with increases in adolescent girls’ BPD symptoms in the same year and in the following year. Results of fixed-effects (within-individual) models revealed that even while controlling for the time-varying impact of symptoms of both internalizing and externalizing disorders, prior and concurrent other substance use, and all time invariant, pre-existing differences between individuals, higher past-year alcohol use was associated with higher levels of BPD symptoms. Furthermore, this association did not vary by age, or by sociodemographic factors, including child race and socioeconomic status of the family. The results of this study indicate heightened risk for the exacerbation of BPD symptoms following increases in alcohol use frequency and highlight the potential utility of interventions targeting drinking behavior for preventing escalations in BPD symptoms.

KW - Adolescence

KW - Alcohol use

KW - Borderline personality disorder

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994246968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84994246968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10802-016-0225-x

DO - 10.1007/s10802-016-0225-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 27812907

AN - SCOPUS:84994246968

VL - 45

SP - 1157

EP - 1167

JO - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

SN - 0091-0627

IS - 6

ER -