A volterra kernel reduced-order model approach for nonlinear aeroelastic analysis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

A procedure to develop CFB-based reduced order models (ROMs) which capture the essence of am aerodynamic system while reducing the complexity of the computational model is introduced. The Volterra-based ROM is obtained using the derivative of unsteady aerodynamic step-response. Transient responses and Gaussian responses were calculated using ROM and compared with the CFD solver for validation of ROM approach. An Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is used to convert ROM unsteady aerodynamics into the LTI state space model. A reduction in the cost of the realization of the ROM kernel is obtained by the identification of the state-space model. Aeroelastic analysis is conducted using state space model. The weakened wall-mounted AGARD wing 445.6 has been used for validation. An aeroelastic analysis of a NACA 65A004 composite wing model is also conducted at M=0.90 including structural nonlinearities. While highly optimized, the state-space model remains a decoupled system and has enough meaningful information about the nature of the aeroelastic system. The proposed approach is computationally efficient without losing structural/aerodynamic nonlinearities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCollection of Technical Papers - AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference
Pages631-648
Number of pages18
Volume1
StatePublished - 2005
Event46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Apr 18 2005Apr 21 2005

Other

Other46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period4/18/054/21/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Architecture

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