A typology and analysis of drug resistance strategies of rural Native Rawaiian youth

Scott K. Okamoto, Susana Helm, Danielle Giroux, Alexis Kaliades, Kaycee Nahe Kawano, Stephen Kulis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the drug resistance strategies described by Native Hawaiian youth residing in rural communities. Sixty-four youth from 7 middle and intermediate schools on the Island of Hawai'i participated in a series of gender-specific focus groups. Youth responded to 15 drug-related problem situations developed and validated from prior research. A total of 509 responses reflecting primary or secondary drug resistance strategies were identified by the youth, which were qualitatively collapsed into 16 different categories. Primary drug resistance strategies were those that participants listed as a single response, or the first part of a two-part response, while secondary drug resistance strategies were those that were used in tandem with primary drug resistance strategies. Over half of the responses reflecting primary drug resistance strategies fell into three different categories ("refuse," "explain," or "angry refusal"), whereas over half of the responses reflecting secondary drug resistance strategies represented one category ("explain"). Significant gender differences were found in the frequency of using different strategies as well as variations in the frequency of using different strategies based on the type of drug offerer (family versus friends/peers). Implications for prevention practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-319
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Primary Prevention
Volume31
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Drug
  • Native Hawaiian
  • Prevention
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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