A transgenic approach to enhance phosphorus use efficiency in crops as part of a comprehensive strategy for sustainable agriculture

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Abstract

Concerns about phosphorus (P) sustainability in agriculture arise not only from the potential of P scarcity but also from the known effects of agricultural P use beyond the field, i.e., eutrophication leading to dead zones in lakes, rivers and coastal oceans due to runoffs from fertilized fields. Plants possess a large number of adaptive responses to Pi (orthophosphate) limitation that provide potential raw materials to enhance Pi scavenging abilities of crop plants. Understanding and engineering these adaptive responses to increase the efficiency of crop capture of natural and fertilizer Pi in soils is one way to optimize Pi use efficiency (PUE) and, together with other approaches, help to meet the P sustainability challenge in agriculture. Research on the molecular and physiological basis of Pi uptake is facilitating the generation of plants with enhanced Pi use efficiency by genetic engineering. Here we describe work done in this direction with emphasis on the up-regulation of plant proton-translocating pyrophosphatases (H+-PPases).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)840-845
Number of pages6
JournalChemosphere
Volume84
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

alternative agriculture
Agriculture
Inorganic Pyrophosphatase
Phosphorus
Crops
phosphorus
crop
Sustainable development
sustainability
agriculture
Genetic engineering
genetic engineering
Eutrophication
crop plant
Scavenging
orthophosphate
Fertilizers
Runoff
Genetic Engineering
Lakes

Keywords

  • Phosphorus (P) sustainability
  • Phosphorus use efficiency (PUE)
  • Proton pyrophophatase
  • Root development
  • Transgenic plants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "A transgenic approach to enhance phosphorus use efficiency in crops as part of a comprehensive strategy for sustainable agriculture",
abstract = "Concerns about phosphorus (P) sustainability in agriculture arise not only from the potential of P scarcity but also from the known effects of agricultural P use beyond the field, i.e., eutrophication leading to dead zones in lakes, rivers and coastal oceans due to runoffs from fertilized fields. Plants possess a large number of adaptive responses to Pi (orthophosphate) limitation that provide potential raw materials to enhance Pi scavenging abilities of crop plants. Understanding and engineering these adaptive responses to increase the efficiency of crop capture of natural and fertilizer Pi in soils is one way to optimize Pi use efficiency (PUE) and, together with other approaches, help to meet the P sustainability challenge in agriculture. Research on the molecular and physiological basis of Pi uptake is facilitating the generation of plants with enhanced Pi use efficiency by genetic engineering. Here we describe work done in this direction with emphasis on the up-regulation of plant proton-translocating pyrophosphatases (H+-PPases).",
keywords = "Phosphorus (P) sustainability, Phosphorus use efficiency (PUE), Proton pyrophophatase, Root development, Transgenic plants",
author = "Roberto Gaxiola and Mark Edwards and James Elser",
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AU - Gaxiola, Roberto

AU - Edwards, Mark

AU - Elser, James

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N2 - Concerns about phosphorus (P) sustainability in agriculture arise not only from the potential of P scarcity but also from the known effects of agricultural P use beyond the field, i.e., eutrophication leading to dead zones in lakes, rivers and coastal oceans due to runoffs from fertilized fields. Plants possess a large number of adaptive responses to Pi (orthophosphate) limitation that provide potential raw materials to enhance Pi scavenging abilities of crop plants. Understanding and engineering these adaptive responses to increase the efficiency of crop capture of natural and fertilizer Pi in soils is one way to optimize Pi use efficiency (PUE) and, together with other approaches, help to meet the P sustainability challenge in agriculture. Research on the molecular and physiological basis of Pi uptake is facilitating the generation of plants with enhanced Pi use efficiency by genetic engineering. Here we describe work done in this direction with emphasis on the up-regulation of plant proton-translocating pyrophosphatases (H+-PPases).

AB - Concerns about phosphorus (P) sustainability in agriculture arise not only from the potential of P scarcity but also from the known effects of agricultural P use beyond the field, i.e., eutrophication leading to dead zones in lakes, rivers and coastal oceans due to runoffs from fertilized fields. Plants possess a large number of adaptive responses to Pi (orthophosphate) limitation that provide potential raw materials to enhance Pi scavenging abilities of crop plants. Understanding and engineering these adaptive responses to increase the efficiency of crop capture of natural and fertilizer Pi in soils is one way to optimize Pi use efficiency (PUE) and, together with other approaches, help to meet the P sustainability challenge in agriculture. Research on the molecular and physiological basis of Pi uptake is facilitating the generation of plants with enhanced Pi use efficiency by genetic engineering. Here we describe work done in this direction with emphasis on the up-regulation of plant proton-translocating pyrophosphatases (H+-PPases).

KW - Phosphorus (P) sustainability

KW - Phosphorus use efficiency (PUE)

KW - Proton pyrophophatase

KW - Root development

KW - Transgenic plants

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