A Test of the Routine Activities and Neighborhood Attachment Explanations for Bias in Disorder Perceptions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

“Neighborhood disorder” refers to how people perceive neighborhoods as unsafe and disorganized. However, certain disorder cues may indicate disorder to some residents but not to others. There are many explanations for disorder perception bias, though few have been tested. This article uses data on 4,721 residents in 100 neighborhoods in Seattle to assess two explanations for biases: neighborhood attachment and routine activities. Using fixed-effect models, this article shows that neighborhood attachment and routine activities provide additional insight into disorder perceptions. Hanging out with teens and engaging in protective neighborhood activities, like watching neighbors’ property, have a strong positive influence on disorder perceptions. This study concludes by discussing alternative explanations for disorder perception bias and their impact on disorder theory as a whole.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-609
Number of pages23
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 2015

Keywords

  • disorder perceptions
  • neighborhood attachment
  • neighborhoods
  • routine activities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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