A Survey of Instruments and Institutions Available for the Global Governance of Artificial Intelligence

Walter G. Johnson, Diana M. Bowman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Emerging Technologies Have always challenged traditional regulatory regimes [1]. This is not new nor is this tension likely to change anytime soon given the increasing speed at which embryonic technologies are emerging into the market [2]. Some of these technologies, such as autonomous vehicles or drones, can be effectively regulated at the national level due to clearly defined jurisdictional boundaries and the existence of relevant national and state/provincial regulatory agencies that oversee their conventional counterparts. While the entry of these technologies into the market will challenge regulators and policymakers and may require tweaking of existing regimes, we argue that these technologies, and the products that they enable, will not require a sui generis response at the national and supranational levels. The same cannot be said for artificial intelligence (AI) and the myriad of interconnected and interwoven applications made possible by AI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Technology and Society Magazine
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Survey of Instruments and Institutions Available for the Global Governance of Artificial Intelligence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this