A state-trait model of negative life event occurrence in adolescence: Predictors of stability in the occurrence of stressors

Kevin M. King, Brooke S G Molina, Laurie Chassin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stressful life events are an important risk factor for psychopathology among children and adolescents. However, variation in life stress may be both stable and time-varying with associated differences in the antecedents. We tested, using latent variable modeling, a state-trait model of stressful life events in adolescence, and predictors of stability in the occurrence of life events, using a high risk sample of children of alcoholic parents and matched controls (n=422). Variation in the number of stressful life events reported at any time point in adolescence could be separated into both stable and time-varying sources of variance, and stability in the occurrence of life events was predicted by parental alcoholism, parenting support, and adolescent temperament. These findings suggest that parental psychopathology, poor relationship with parents, and temperament contribute to produce stable stress during adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)848-859
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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