A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size

Alistair R. Evans, E. Susanne Daly, Kierstin K. Catlett, Kathleen S. Paul, Stephen J. King, Matthew M. Skinner, Hans P. Nesse, Jean Jacques Hublin, Grant C. Townsend, Gary Schwartz, Jukka Jernvall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The variation in molar tooth size in humans and our closest relatives (hominins) has strongly influenced our view of human evolution. The reduction in overall size and disproportionate decrease in third molar size have been noted for over a century, and have been attributed to reduced selection for large dentitions owing to changes in diet or the acquisition of cooking. The systematic pattern of size variation along the tooth row has been described as a 'morphogenetic gradienta' in mammal, and more specifically hominin, teeth since Butler and Dahlberg. However, the underlying controls of tooth size have not been well understood, with hypotheses ranging from morphogenetic fields to the clone theory. In this study we address the following question: are there rules that govern how hominin tooth size evolves? Here we propose that the inhibitory cascade, an activator-inhibitor mechanism that affects relative tooth size in mammals, produces the default pattern of tooth sizes for all lower primary postcanine teeth (deciduous premolars and permanent molars) in hominins. This configuration is also equivalent to a morphogenetic gradient, finally pointing to a mechanism that can generate this gradient. The pattern of tooth size remains constant with absolute size in australopiths (including Ardipithecus, Australopithecus and Paranthropus). However, in species of Homo, including modern humans, there is a tight link between tooth proportions and absolute size such that a single developmental parameter can explain both the relative and absolute sizes of primary postcanine teeth. On the basis of the relationship of inhibitory cascade patterning with size, we can use the size at one tooth position to predict the sizes of the remaining four primary postcanine teeth in the row for hominins. Our study provides a development-based expectation to examine the evolution of the unique proportions of human teeth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-480
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume530
Issue number7591
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 2016

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Hominidae
Tooth
Deciduous Tooth
Mammals
Third Molar
Dentition
Bicuspid
Cooking
Clone Cells
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Evans, A. R., Daly, E. S., Catlett, K. K., Paul, K. S., King, S. J., Skinner, M. M., ... Jernvall, J. (2016). A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size. Nature, 530(7591), 477-480. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16972

A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size. / Evans, Alistair R.; Daly, E. Susanne; Catlett, Kierstin K.; Paul, Kathleen S.; King, Stephen J.; Skinner, Matthew M.; Nesse, Hans P.; Hublin, Jean Jacques; Townsend, Grant C.; Schwartz, Gary; Jernvall, Jukka.

In: Nature, Vol. 530, No. 7591, 24.02.2016, p. 477-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evans, AR, Daly, ES, Catlett, KK, Paul, KS, King, SJ, Skinner, MM, Nesse, HP, Hublin, JJ, Townsend, GC, Schwartz, G & Jernvall, J 2016, 'A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size', Nature, vol. 530, no. 7591, pp. 477-480. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16972
Evans AR, Daly ES, Catlett KK, Paul KS, King SJ, Skinner MM et al. A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size. Nature. 2016 Feb 24;530(7591):477-480. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16972
Evans, Alistair R. ; Daly, E. Susanne ; Catlett, Kierstin K. ; Paul, Kathleen S. ; King, Stephen J. ; Skinner, Matthew M. ; Nesse, Hans P. ; Hublin, Jean Jacques ; Townsend, Grant C. ; Schwartz, Gary ; Jernvall, Jukka. / A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size. In: Nature. 2016 ; Vol. 530, No. 7591. pp. 477-480.
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