A scanning force microscope study of detachment of nanometer-sized particles from glass surfaces

J. T. Dickinson, Rizal Hariadi, L. Scudiero, S. C. Langford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nominal shear stress required to detach nanometer-scale, single-crystal salt particles from a soda lime glass substrate is a strong function of particle size and relative humidity. We use the tip of an atomic force microscope to detach these particles from a glass substrate under controlled atmospheres of known humidity. The peak lateral force at detachment was divided by the nominal particle area to yield an effective interfacial shear strength. We describe the variation of shear strength with particle area and humidity in terms of detachment by chemically assisted crack growth along the salt-glass interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-119
Number of pages7
JournalTribology Letters
Volume7
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

detachment
Atmospheric humidity
Microscopes
microscopes
Scanning
Glass
Shear strength
scanning
glass
humidity
Salts
shear strength
Substrates
Lime
Shear stress
Crack propagation
salts
controlled atmospheres
Particle size
Single crystals

Keywords

  • Chemical mechanical polishing
  • Humidity effects
  • Particle removal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

A scanning force microscope study of detachment of nanometer-sized particles from glass surfaces. / Dickinson, J. T.; Hariadi, Rizal; Scudiero, L.; Langford, S. C.

In: Tribology Letters, Vol. 7, No. 2-3, 1999, p. 113-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dickinson, J. T. ; Hariadi, Rizal ; Scudiero, L. ; Langford, S. C. / A scanning force microscope study of detachment of nanometer-sized particles from glass surfaces. In: Tribology Letters. 1999 ; Vol. 7, No. 2-3. pp. 113-119.
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