A Review of the Biology, Ecology, and Management of the South American Locust, Schistocerca cancellata (Serville, 1838), and Future Prospects

Eduardo V. Trumper, Arianne J. Cease, María Marta Cigliano, Fernando Copa Bazán, Carlos E. Lange, Héctor E. Medina, Rick P. Overson, Clara Therville, Martina E. Pocco, Cyril Piou, Gustavo Zagaglia, David Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the first half of the twentieth century, the South American Locust (SAL), Schistocerca cancellata (Serville, 1838), was a major pest of agriculture in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Brazil. From 1954–2014, a preventive management program appeared to limit SAL populations, with only small-to moderate-scale treatments required, limited to outbreak areas in northwest Argentina. However, the lack of major locust outbreaks led to a gradual reduction in resources, and in 2015, the sudden appearance of swarms marked the beginning of a substantial upsurge, with many swarms reported initially in Argentina in 2015, followed by expansion into neighboring countries over the next few years. The upsurge required a rapid allocation of resources for management of SAL and a detailed examination of the improvements needed for the successful management of this species. This paper provides a review of SAL biology, management history, and perspectives on navigating a plague period after a 60-year recession.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number135
JournalAgronomy
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Locust plagues
  • Management
  • Population dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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