A retrospective analysis of factors correlated to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) respiratory health at Gombe National Park, Tanzania

Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Carson M. Murray, Eric V. Lonsdorf, Dominic A. Travis, Ian Gilby, Julia Chosy, Jane Goodall, Anne E. Pusey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infectious disease and other health hazards have been hypothesized to pose serious threats to the persistence of wild ape populations. Respiratory disease outbreaks have been shown to be of particular concern for several wild chimpanzee study sites, leading managers, and researchers to hypothesize that diseases originating from and/or spread by humans pose a substantial risk to the long-term survival of chimpanzee populations. The total chimpanzee population in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, has declined from 120-150 in the 1960s to about 100 by the end of 2007, with death associated with observable signs of disease as the leading cause of mortality. We used a historical data set collected from 1979 to 1987 to investigate the baseline rates of respiratory illness in chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania, and to analyze the impact of human-related factors (e.g., banana feeding, visits to staff quarters) and non-human-related factors (e.g., sociality, season) on chimpanzee respiratory illness rates. We found that season and banana feeding were the most significant predictors of respiratory health clinical signs during this time period. We discuss these results in the context of management options for the reduction of disease risk and the importance of long-term observational data for conservation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-35
Number of pages10
JournalEcoHealth
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tanzania
Pan troglodytes
Statistical Factor Analysis
national park
Health
Musa
Respiratory Rate
respiratory disease
infectious disease
wild population
Population
persistence
Hominidae
mortality
Risk Reduction Behavior
Disease Outbreaks
Communicable Diseases
Research Personnel
Recreational Parks
analysis

Keywords

  • chimpanzees
  • conservation
  • disease
  • Gombe National Park
  • respiratory illness
  • risk management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

A retrospective analysis of factors correlated to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) respiratory health at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. / Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Murray, Carson M.; Lonsdorf, Eric V.; Travis, Dominic A.; Gilby, Ian; Chosy, Julia; Goodall, Jane; Pusey, Anne E.

In: EcoHealth, Vol. 8, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 26-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V. ; Murray, Carson M. ; Lonsdorf, Eric V. ; Travis, Dominic A. ; Gilby, Ian ; Chosy, Julia ; Goodall, Jane ; Pusey, Anne E. / A retrospective analysis of factors correlated to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) respiratory health at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. In: EcoHealth. 2011 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 26-35.
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