A Randomized Trial of Methods to Engage Mexican American Parents Into a School-Based Parenting Intervention

Emily Winslow, Elizabeth Poloskov, Rachelle Begay, Jenn-Yun Tein, Irwin Sandler, Sharlene Wolchik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the efficacy of motivational strategies for increasing engagement into evidence-based, parenting interventions delivered through schools. Method: Participants were 122 mothers of kindergarten and third grade students attending an urban school that predominantly served Mexican American families living in low-income conditions. At pretest, mothers reported sociocultural characteristics, and teachers rated children's behavior. Mothers randomly assigned to the experimental condition received a multicomponent engagement package mothers assigned to the control condition received a brochure plus a nonengagement survey interview. All families were offered a free parenting program delivered at their child's school. Dependent variables included parenting program enrollment, initiation (i.e., attending at least 1 session), and attendance. Results: Parents in the experimental condition were more likely to initiate compared with those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems (OR = 8.98, p &< .001, 95% CI [2.55, 31.57]). Parents in the experimental condition attended more sessions than did those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems p &< .01, d = .49, 95% CI [.35, 2.26]) or conduct problems p &< .01, d = .54, 95% CI [.51, 2.56]). Highly acculturated parents attended more sessions if assigned to the experimental condition than the control condition p &< .01, d = .66, 95% CI [.28, 2.57]). Conclusions: The motivational engagement package increased parenting program initiation and attendance for parents of students at-risk for behavior problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 5 2016

Fingerprint

Parenting
Parents
Mothers
Students
Pamphlets
Child Behavior
Risk-Taking
Interviews
Mexican Americans

Keywords

  • Attendance
  • Engagement
  • Latino
  • Parenting
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "A Randomized Trial of Methods to Engage Mexican American Parents Into a School-Based Parenting Intervention",
abstract = "Objective: This study examined the efficacy of motivational strategies for increasing engagement into evidence-based, parenting interventions delivered through schools. Method: Participants were 122 mothers of kindergarten and third grade students attending an urban school that predominantly served Mexican American families living in low-income conditions. At pretest, mothers reported sociocultural characteristics, and teachers rated children's behavior. Mothers randomly assigned to the experimental condition received a multicomponent engagement package mothers assigned to the control condition received a brochure plus a nonengagement survey interview. All families were offered a free parenting program delivered at their child's school. Dependent variables included parenting program enrollment, initiation (i.e., attending at least 1 session), and attendance. Results: Parents in the experimental condition were more likely to initiate compared with those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems (OR = 8.98, p &< .001, 95{\%} CI [2.55, 31.57]). Parents in the experimental condition attended more sessions than did those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems p &< .01, d = .49, 95{\%} CI [.35, 2.26]) or conduct problems p &< .01, d = .54, 95{\%} CI [.51, 2.56]). Highly acculturated parents attended more sessions if assigned to the experimental condition than the control condition p &< .01, d = .66, 95{\%} CI [.28, 2.57]). Conclusions: The motivational engagement package increased parenting program initiation and attendance for parents of students at-risk for behavior problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).",
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author = "Emily Winslow and Elizabeth Poloskov and Rachelle Begay and Jenn-Yun Tein and Irwin Sandler and Sharlene Wolchik",
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AU - Poloskov, Elizabeth

AU - Begay, Rachelle

AU - Tein, Jenn-Yun

AU - Sandler, Irwin

AU - Wolchik, Sharlene

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N2 - Objective: This study examined the efficacy of motivational strategies for increasing engagement into evidence-based, parenting interventions delivered through schools. Method: Participants were 122 mothers of kindergarten and third grade students attending an urban school that predominantly served Mexican American families living in low-income conditions. At pretest, mothers reported sociocultural characteristics, and teachers rated children's behavior. Mothers randomly assigned to the experimental condition received a multicomponent engagement package mothers assigned to the control condition received a brochure plus a nonengagement survey interview. All families were offered a free parenting program delivered at their child's school. Dependent variables included parenting program enrollment, initiation (i.e., attending at least 1 session), and attendance. Results: Parents in the experimental condition were more likely to initiate compared with those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems (OR = 8.98, p &< .001, 95% CI [2.55, 31.57]). Parents in the experimental condition attended more sessions than did those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems p &< .01, d = .49, 95% CI [.35, 2.26]) or conduct problems p &< .01, d = .54, 95% CI [.51, 2.56]). Highly acculturated parents attended more sessions if assigned to the experimental condition than the control condition p &< .01, d = .66, 95% CI [.28, 2.57]). Conclusions: The motivational engagement package increased parenting program initiation and attendance for parents of students at-risk for behavior problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

AB - Objective: This study examined the efficacy of motivational strategies for increasing engagement into evidence-based, parenting interventions delivered through schools. Method: Participants were 122 mothers of kindergarten and third grade students attending an urban school that predominantly served Mexican American families living in low-income conditions. At pretest, mothers reported sociocultural characteristics, and teachers rated children's behavior. Mothers randomly assigned to the experimental condition received a multicomponent engagement package mothers assigned to the control condition received a brochure plus a nonengagement survey interview. All families were offered a free parenting program delivered at their child's school. Dependent variables included parenting program enrollment, initiation (i.e., attending at least 1 session), and attendance. Results: Parents in the experimental condition were more likely to initiate compared with those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems (OR = 8.98, p &< .001, 95% CI [2.55, 31.57]). Parents in the experimental condition attended more sessions than did those in the control condition if their children had high baseline concentration problems p &< .01, d = .49, 95% CI [.35, 2.26]) or conduct problems p &< .01, d = .54, 95% CI [.51, 2.56]). Highly acculturated parents attended more sessions if assigned to the experimental condition than the control condition p &< .01, d = .66, 95% CI [.28, 2.57]). Conclusions: The motivational engagement package increased parenting program initiation and attendance for parents of students at-risk for behavior problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

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