A randomized controlled trial of an office-based physical activity and physical fitness intervention for older adults

Janet Purath, Colleen S. Keller, Sterling McPherson, Barbara Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This primary care-based study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a 24-week intervention on physical activity and physical fitness in a group of community-dwelling older adults. Secondary aims were to determine the effect of the intervention on self-efficacy and barriers to physical activity. Intervention participants (n = 36) received an exercise prescription based on physical fitness test results and personal choice. Comparison participants (n = 36) received a nutrition intervention. Both groups received 10 follow-up telephone calls. Repeated measures ANOVA analyses showed no direct effects of the intervention on the primary outcomes of physical activity or physical fitness in the intervention group (p > 0.05). Secondary analyses with ANCOVA that included potential moderating variables of age, gender, income, BMI, and support for physical activity showed that the intervention group significantly increased frequency of all physical activity (F = 3.50, p < 0.05) as well as the fitness outcomes of lower body strength (F = 3.63, p < 0.05) and aerobic endurance (F = 4.03, p < 0.05). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the use of fitness measures to increase physical activity and fitness in the primary care setting. The intervention improved some aspects of physical activity and fitness for selected participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-211
Number of pages8
JournalGeriatric Nursing
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Randomized Controlled Trials
Primary Health Care
Independent Living
Self Efficacy
Telephone
Prescriptions
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Intervention
  • Older adult
  • Physical activity
  • Physical fitness
  • Randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology

Cite this

A randomized controlled trial of an office-based physical activity and physical fitness intervention for older adults. / Purath, Janet; Keller, Colleen S.; McPherson, Sterling; Ainsworth, Barbara.

In: Geriatric Nursing, Vol. 34, No. 3, 05.2013, p. 204-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Purath, Janet ; Keller, Colleen S. ; McPherson, Sterling ; Ainsworth, Barbara. / A randomized controlled trial of an office-based physical activity and physical fitness intervention for older adults. In: Geriatric Nursing. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 204-211.
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