A psychosocial resource impairment model explaining partner violence and distress: Moderating role of income

Stacey L. Williams, Kristin D. Mickelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the role of income in a psychosocial resource impairment model that explains partner violence and distress. Using data from a nationally representative sample, we test whether psychosocial resources of social support and self-esteem operate differently in four income groups (poor, "working"-poor, middle and upper-income). Structural equation modeling shows that among women considered working-poor, low self-esteem is relevant for the process through which violence becomes linked to distress. Women of upper-income appear distinct with negative interactions serving as sole mediator of violence and distress. Other findings indicate impaired support may mediate the violence and distress relation for women, regardless of income. Overall, income partially moderates the impact of partner violence on distress, suggesting social contexts should be considered when examining the effects of violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-25
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican journal of community psychology
Volume40
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Distress
  • Income
  • Partner violence
  • Resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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