A psychosocial model of sun protection and sunbathing in young women: The impact of health beliefs, attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy for sun protection

Kristina M. Jackson, Leona S. Aiken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Scopus citations

Abstract

A psychosocial model of sun protection and sunbathing as distinct behaviors was developed on 202 young Caucasian women and replicated in an independent sample (n = 207). Proximal outcomes were intention to sun protect and intention to sunbathe; distal outcomes included sun protection and sunbathing behavior measured 5 months later. Objective risk for skin cancer plus 4 classes of psychosocial variables (sun-protective health beliefs, self-efficacy for sun protection, attitudes toward sunbathing, and norms for sunbathing and sun protection) served as predictors. Sun-protective norms and self-efficacy for sun protection predicted only intention to sun protect; sunbathing norms predicted only intention to sunbathe. Susceptibility and advantages of tanning predicted both intention constructs, which, in turn, predicted behavior. These findings distinguish sun protection from sunbathing and provide a basis for intervention design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-478
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • Health belief model
  • Norms
  • Photoaging
  • Skin cancer
  • Sun protection
  • Sunscreen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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