A polynomial-time algorithm for computing disjoint lightpath pairs in minimum isolated-failure-immune WDM optical networks

Guoliang Xue, Ravi Gottapu, Xi Fang, Dejun Yang, Krishnaiyan Thulasiraman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A fundamental problem in survivable routing in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical networks is the computation of a pair of link-disjoint (or node-disjoint) lightpaths connecting a source with a destination, subject to the wavelength continuity constraint. However, this problem is NP-hard when the underlying network topology is a general mesh network. As a result, heuristic algorithms and integer linear programming (ILP) formulations for solving this problem have been proposed. In this paper, we advocate the use of 2-edge connected (or 2-node connected) subgraphs of minimum isolated failure immune networks as the underlying topology for WDM optical networks. We present a polynomial-time algorithm for computing a pair of link-disjoint lightpaths with shortest total length in such networks. The running time of our algorithm is O(nW2), where n is the number of nodes, and W is the number of wavelengths per link. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and scalability of our algorithm. Extension of our algorithm to the node-disjoint case is straightforward.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6519289
Pages (from-to)470-483
Number of pages14
JournalIEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Disjoint lightpath pairs
  • minimum isolated failure immune networks
  • partial 2-trees
  • wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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