A passive ankle-foot prosthesis with energy return to mimic able-bodied gait

Robert Holgate, Thomas Sugar, Audrey Nash, Jasper Kianpour, Craig Trevor Johnson, Edwin Santos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It has been shown previously that for slow to normal walking speeds the ankle joint behaves similar to a passive mechanism from foot flat to push off. Thus a passive ankle mechanism was developed in order to mimic able-bodied gait in amputees. The ankle device is shown to be capable of matching the ground slope during heel strike, efficiently storing breaking energy from the user during rollover then releasing that energy to assist in push off, and raising the toe during swing phase to reset the system for the next heel strike. Mechanism functionality was verified through lab testing. Human testing was done through an ankle-bypass system on able-bodied subjects to verify device safety and functionality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Volume5A-2017
ISBN (Electronic)9780791858172
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes
EventASME 2017 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2017 - Cleveland, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2017Aug 9 2017

Other

OtherASME 2017 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2017
CountryUnited States
CityCleveland
Period8/6/178/9/17

Fingerprint

Gait
Safety devices
Testing
Energy
Slope
Safety
Verify
Prostheses and Implants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Holgate, R., Sugar, T., Nash, A., Kianpour, J., Johnson, C. T., & Santos, E. (2017). A passive ankle-foot prosthesis with energy return to mimic able-bodied gait. In 41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference (Vol. 5A-2017). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2017-67192

A passive ankle-foot prosthesis with energy return to mimic able-bodied gait. / Holgate, Robert; Sugar, Thomas; Nash, Audrey; Kianpour, Jasper; Johnson, Craig Trevor; Santos, Edwin.

41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference. Vol. 5A-2017 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Holgate, R, Sugar, T, Nash, A, Kianpour, J, Johnson, CT & Santos, E 2017, A passive ankle-foot prosthesis with energy return to mimic able-bodied gait. in 41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference. vol. 5A-2017, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2017 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2017, Cleveland, United States, 8/6/17. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2017-67192
Holgate R, Sugar T, Nash A, Kianpour J, Johnson CT, Santos E. A passive ankle-foot prosthesis with energy return to mimic able-bodied gait. In 41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference. Vol. 5A-2017. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2017 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2017-67192
Holgate, Robert ; Sugar, Thomas ; Nash, Audrey ; Kianpour, Jasper ; Johnson, Craig Trevor ; Santos, Edwin. / A passive ankle-foot prosthesis with energy return to mimic able-bodied gait. 41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference. Vol. 5A-2017 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2017.
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