A multidimensional examination of psychological distress among Latina mothers with and without HIV

Mee Young Um, Arati Maleku, Rachel Rios-Richardson, Eric Rice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Latino population is disproportionally affected by HIV in the United States. Latina women, in particular, have significantly higher rates of HIV diagnosis than their White counterparts. Latinas with HIV who are primary family caregivers face multidimensional challenges from caregiving demands to stressors related to chronic illness, acculturation, family functioning, and socioeconomic disparities, which may contribute to higher psychological distress than Latina mothers without HIV. However, to date, scant research has focused on the mental health needs of Latina mothers living with HIV (MLHs) and how these needs are similar or different to Latina mothers without HIV. Thus, using a multidimensional approach we: (a) examined the associations between HIV status, acculturation, family functioning, socioeconomic status, and psychological distress among Latina mothers and (b) identified how these associations differed between Latina mothers with and without HIV. Cross-sectional, self-reported data were obtained via face-to-face interviews from 221 Latina MLHs and 116 Latina neighborhood control mothers (NCMs) living without HIV in Los Angeles, California. Results from multivariate ordinary least square regressions showed that higher acculturation was associated with psychological distress among MLHs, whereas higher levels of family conflict and education were associated with psychological distress among NCMs. Findings highlight the differential mental health needs of Latina mothers based on HIV status. Our study findings provide social work implications for culturally responsive interventions that can address multidimensional stressors experienced by marginalized Latinas MLHs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSocial Work in Public Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • family functioning
  • Latina mothers with HIV
  • psychological distress
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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