A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene

Caroline Schill, John M. Anderies, Therese Lindahl, Carl Folke, Stephen Polasky, Juan Camilo Cárdenas, Anne Sophie Crépin, Marco A. Janssen, Jon Norberg, Maja Schlüter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Human behaviour is of profound significance in shaping pathways towards sustainability. Yet, the approach to understanding human behaviour in many fields remains reliant on overly simplistic models. For a better understanding of the interface between human behaviour and sustainability, we take work in behavioural economics and cognitive psychology as a starting point, but argue for an expansion of this work by adopting a more dynamic and systemic understanding of human behaviour, that is, as part of complex adaptive systems. A complex adaptive systems approach allows us to capture behaviour as ‘enculturated’ and ‘enearthed’, co-evolving with socio–cultural and biophysical contexts. Connecting human behaviour and context through a complex adaptive systems lens is critical to inform environmental governance and management for sustainability, and ultimately to better understand the dynamics of the Anthropocene itself.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalNature Sustainability
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

    Fingerprint

    human behavior
    Adaptive systems
    Sustainable development
    sustainability
    environmental governance
    Lenses
    Behavioral Economics
    psychology
    environmental management
    Economics
    Lens
    Systems Analysis
    Anthropocene
    economics
    governance
    Psychology
    management

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Global and Planetary Change
    • Food Science
    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Ecology
    • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
    • Urban Studies
    • Nature and Landscape Conservation
    • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

    Cite this

    Schill, C., Anderies, J. M., Lindahl, T., Folke, C., Polasky, S., Cárdenas, J. C., ... Schlüter, M. (Accepted/In press). A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene. Nature Sustainability. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-019-0419-7

    A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene. / Schill, Caroline; Anderies, John M.; Lindahl, Therese; Folke, Carl; Polasky, Stephen; Cárdenas, Juan Camilo; Crépin, Anne Sophie; Janssen, Marco A.; Norberg, Jon; Schlüter, Maja.

    In: Nature Sustainability, 01.01.2019.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Schill, C, Anderies, JM, Lindahl, T, Folke, C, Polasky, S, Cárdenas, JC, Crépin, AS, Janssen, MA, Norberg, J & Schlüter, M 2019, 'A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene', Nature Sustainability. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-019-0419-7
    Schill C, Anderies JM, Lindahl T, Folke C, Polasky S, Cárdenas JC et al. A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene. Nature Sustainability. 2019 Jan 1. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-019-0419-7
    Schill, Caroline ; Anderies, John M. ; Lindahl, Therese ; Folke, Carl ; Polasky, Stephen ; Cárdenas, Juan Camilo ; Crépin, Anne Sophie ; Janssen, Marco A. ; Norberg, Jon ; Schlüter, Maja. / A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene. In: Nature Sustainability. 2019.
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