A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator

Bruce C. Towe, Patrick J. Larson, Daniel W. Gulick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An unexpectedly simple implantable device that can achieve wireless neurostimulation consists of a short 1 cm long dipole platinum wire antenna, a Schottky diode, and a pulsed microwave transmitter. Fabricated into a 1 cm long by polyimide tubing, the implant can have a sub-millimeter diameter form factor suited to introduction into tissue by injection. Experiments that chronically implant the device next to a rat sciatic nerve show that a 915 MHz microwave transmitter emitting an average power of 0.5 watts has an ability to stimulate motor events when spaced up to 7 cm from the body surface. Tissue models consisting of saline filled tanks show the possibility of delivering milliampere pulsed current to neurosimulators though 5 centimeters or more of tissue. Such a neurostimulation system driven by microwave energy is limited in functional tissue depth by microwave SAR exposure. This report discusses some of the advantages and limitations of such a neurostimulation approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
Pages5006-5009
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 28 2012Sep 1 2012

Other

Other34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/28/129/1/12

Fingerprint

Microwaves
Tissue
Injections
Transmitters
Equipment and Supplies
Sciatic Nerve
Tubing
Platinum
Polyimides
Rats
Diodes
Wire
Antennas
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Towe, B. C., Larson, P. J., & Gulick, D. W. (2012). A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator. In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS (pp. 5006-5009). [6347117] https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2012.6347117

A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator. / Towe, Bruce C.; Larson, Patrick J.; Gulick, Daniel W.

Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS. 2012. p. 5006-5009 6347117.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Towe, BC, Larson, PJ & Gulick, DW 2012, A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator. in Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS., 6347117, pp. 5006-5009, 34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012, San Diego, CA, United States, 8/28/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2012.6347117
Towe BC, Larson PJ, Gulick DW. A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator. In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS. 2012. p. 5006-5009. 6347117 https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2012.6347117
Towe, Bruce C. ; Larson, Patrick J. ; Gulick, Daniel W. / A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS. 2012. pp. 5006-5009
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