A metric for the shared interpretation of commander's intent

Jennifer L. Winner, Jared T. Freeman, Nancy J. Cooke, Gerald F. Goodwin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

An enduring challenge in management and in military command is ensuring that subordinates select actions as their leader would, particularly when circumstances change unexpectedly. An experiment was conducted to test a measure of shared interpretation of commander's intent and its effects on the adaptability of subordinates. Performance was measured in the context of a simulated law enforcement task. A course of action ranking procedure was used as a measure of interpretation of intent with rank order correlation reflecting shared interpretation. The study validates a measure of shared interpretation of commander's intent and supports the hypothesis that making values explicit enhances shared interpretation and adaptability. The findings indicate that when missions change in unexpected ways, a commander's intent statement that presents the values by which actions are to be prioritized produces greater agreement between commander and subordinates on action preferences than do intent statements that prescribe command preference for specific actions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
Pages122-126
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2007Oct 5 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period10/1/0710/5/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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