A Meta-Analysis of Single Subject Design Writing Intervention Research

Leslie Ann Rogers, Stephen Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is considerable concern that students do not develop the writing skills needed for school, occupational, or personal success. A frequent explanation for this is that schools do not do a good job of teaching this complex skill. A recent meta-analysis of true- and quasi-experimental writing intervention research (S. Graham & D. Perin, 2007a) addressed this issue by identifying effective instructional writing practices. The current review extends this earlier work by conducting a meta-analysis of single subject design writing intervention studies. The authors located 88 single subject design studies where it was possible to calculate an effect size. They calculated an average effect size for treatments that were tested in 4 or more studies, using a similar outcome measure in each study. This resulted in the identification of 9 writing treatments that were supported as effective. These were strategy instruction for planning/drafting, teaching grammar and usage, goal setting for productivity, strategy instruction for editing, writing with a word processor, reinforcing specific writing outcomes, use of prewriting activities, teaching sentence construction skills, and strategy instruction for paragraph writing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)879-906
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meta-Analysis
Research
Teaching
instruction
school
grammar
productivity
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Students
planning
Therapeutics
student

Keywords

  • composition
  • instruction
  • meta-analysis
  • single subject design
  • writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

A Meta-Analysis of Single Subject Design Writing Intervention Research. / Rogers, Leslie Ann; Graham, Stephen.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 100, No. 4, 11.2008, p. 879-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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