A matter of concern: Kenneth Burke, phishing, and the rhetoric of national insecurity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This essay draws on concepts developed by Kenneth Burke to examine how a rhetoric of national insecurity has saturated phishing research and antiphishing campaigns. In response to the widespread public dispersal of antiphishing campaigns, it calls for a new terminology that challenges the underlying racial violence that characterizes its current practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-190
Number of pages21
JournalRhetoric Review
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Rhetoric
Kenneth Burke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

A matter of concern : Kenneth Burke, phishing, and the rhetoric of national insecurity. / Jensen, Kyle.

In: Rhetoric Review, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.04.2011, p. 170-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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