A longitudinal study of the research productivity of graduates of accounting doctoral programs

James R. Hasselback, Alan Reinstein, Philip M J Reckers

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

While the number of graduates from U.S. accounting doctoral programs has declined significantly since the early 1990s (thus producing a significant faculty shortage), many schools' research requirements to achieve promotion and tenure [P & T] have increased significantly-along with salary packages for new faculty. The purposes of the study reported here are to: (1) compare the research output of accounting doctoral graduates across time (1989-1993 period versus their 1999-2003 counterparts) to see if there is sufficiently enhanced output to justify today's higher entry level salaries; and (2) extract from productivity measures information relative to P & T decisions, thus providing benchmarks for promotion to associate and full professor. We examine research records for 6 and 12 years beyond graduation because these are frequently relevant to tenure and promotion decisions.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalAdvances in Accounting
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1800

Fingerprint

Research productivity
Longitudinal study
Tenure
Salary
Graduation
Shortage
Productivity
Benchmark
Research output

Keywords

  • Benchmarks
  • Citation indices
  • Recruiting
  • Research productivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Accounting

Cite this

A longitudinal study of the research productivity of graduates of accounting doctoral programs. / Hasselback, James R.; Reinstein, Alan; Reckers, Philip M J.

In: Advances in Accounting, 1800.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

@article{40846e1e70624bcea6bd2f64eca492cd,
title = "A longitudinal study of the research productivity of graduates of accounting doctoral programs",
abstract = "While the number of graduates from U.S. accounting doctoral programs has declined significantly since the early 1990s (thus producing a significant faculty shortage), many schools' research requirements to achieve promotion and tenure [P & T] have increased significantly-along with salary packages for new faculty. The purposes of the study reported here are to: (1) compare the research output of accounting doctoral graduates across time (1989-1993 period versus their 1999-2003 counterparts) to see if there is sufficiently enhanced output to justify today's higher entry level salaries; and (2) extract from productivity measures information relative to P & T decisions, thus providing benchmarks for promotion to associate and full professor. We examine research records for 6 and 12 years beyond graduation because these are frequently relevant to tenure and promotion decisions.",
keywords = "Benchmarks, Citation indices, Recruiting, Research productivity",
author = "Hasselback, {James R.} and Alan Reinstein and Reckers, {Philip M J}",
year = "1800",
doi = "10.1016/j.adiac.2011.01.001",
journal = "Advances in Accounting",
issn = "0882-6110",
publisher = "JAI Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A longitudinal study of the research productivity of graduates of accounting doctoral programs

AU - Hasselback,James R.

AU - Reinstein,Alan

AU - Reckers,Philip M J

PY - 1800

Y1 - 1800

N2 - While the number of graduates from U.S. accounting doctoral programs has declined significantly since the early 1990s (thus producing a significant faculty shortage), many schools' research requirements to achieve promotion and tenure [P & T] have increased significantly-along with salary packages for new faculty. The purposes of the study reported here are to: (1) compare the research output of accounting doctoral graduates across time (1989-1993 period versus their 1999-2003 counterparts) to see if there is sufficiently enhanced output to justify today's higher entry level salaries; and (2) extract from productivity measures information relative to P & T decisions, thus providing benchmarks for promotion to associate and full professor. We examine research records for 6 and 12 years beyond graduation because these are frequently relevant to tenure and promotion decisions.

AB - While the number of graduates from U.S. accounting doctoral programs has declined significantly since the early 1990s (thus producing a significant faculty shortage), many schools' research requirements to achieve promotion and tenure [P & T] have increased significantly-along with salary packages for new faculty. The purposes of the study reported here are to: (1) compare the research output of accounting doctoral graduates across time (1989-1993 period versus their 1999-2003 counterparts) to see if there is sufficiently enhanced output to justify today's higher entry level salaries; and (2) extract from productivity measures information relative to P & T decisions, thus providing benchmarks for promotion to associate and full professor. We examine research records for 6 and 12 years beyond graduation because these are frequently relevant to tenure and promotion decisions.

KW - Benchmarks

KW - Citation indices

KW - Recruiting

KW - Research productivity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951550712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79951550712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.adiac.2011.01.001

DO - 10.1016/j.adiac.2011.01.001

M3 - Article

JO - Advances in Accounting

T2 - Advances in Accounting

JF - Advances in Accounting

SN - 0882-6110

ER -