A longitudinal study of the impact of cumulative violence victimization on comorbid posttraumatic stress and depression among female nurses and nursing personnel

Courtenay Cavanaugh, Jacquelyn Campbell, Jill Messing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the impact of cumulative violence victimization on health care workers' subsequent posttraumatic stress-depression comorbidity. Female nurses and nursing personnel (N = 1,044) answered questions about lifetime violence victimization (e.g., childhood abuse, intimate partner violence, and workplace violence) at baseline and completed the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) Disorder screen and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale 6 months later. Seven percent screened positive for comorbid posttraumatic stress-depression at 6-month monitoring. Workers who reported one, two, or three or more types of violence victimization at baseline had 2.41 (p < .10), 2.35 (p > .05), and 6.44 (p < .01) greater odds, respectively, of subsequently screening positive for comorbid PTS-depression compared to their counterparts who reported no violence victimization at baseline. These results suggest the need to provide female nurses and nursing personnel with information about (1) the risk cumulative violence victimization poses for poorer mental health and functioning, and (2) evidence-based trauma informed treatment options outside their place of employment for those affected by violence victimization who develop mental health symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-232
Number of pages9
JournalWorkplace Health and Safety
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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