A longitudinal study of parental anti-substance-use socialization for early adolescents’ substance-use behaviors

YoungJu Shin, Michelle Miller-Day

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examines the role of communication in shaping norms and behaviors with significant personal and societal consequences. Based on primary socialization theory and the general theory of family communication, parental anti-substance-use socialization processes were hypothesized to influence early adolescents’ substance-use norms and behaviors. Using longitudinal data (N = 1059), the results revealed that parent-adolescent prevention communication about substance use in the media and parental anti-substance-use injunctive norms were positively associated with early adolescents’ personal anti-substance-use norms, which, in turn, led to decreases in recent alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. It was also found that family expressiveness and structural traditionalism positively related to the hypothesized association between parental socialization processes and early adolescents’ norms and behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-297
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2017

Keywords

  • Parental socialization
  • family communication environments
  • norms
  • parent–child communication
  • youth substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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