A landscape perspective on bat foraging ecology along rivers: Does channel confinement and insect availability influence the response of bats to aquatic resources in riverine landscapes?

Elizabeth M. Hagen, John Sabo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

River and riparian areas provide an important foraging habitat for insectivorous bats owing to high insect availability along waterways. However, structural characteristics of the riverine landscape may also influence the location of foraging bats. We used bat detectors to compare bat activity longitudinally along river reaches with contrasting channel confinement, ratio of valley floor width to active channel width, and riparian vegetation, and laterally with distance from the river along three different reach types. We measured rates of insect emergence from the river and aerial insect availability above the river and laterally up to 50-m into the riparian habitat in order to assess the relationship between food resources and insectivorous bat activity. Longitudinally, bat activity was concentrated along confined reaches in comparison to unconfined reaches but was not related to insect availability. Laterally, bats tracked exponential declines in aquatic insects with distance from the river. These data suggest that along the lateral dimension bats track food resources, but that along the longitudinal dimension channel shape and landscape structure determine bat distributions more than food resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-760
Number of pages10
JournalOecologia
Volume166
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 26 2011

Fingerprint

river channel
bat
Chiroptera
foraging
insect
ecology
insects
rivers
resource
river
food
aquatic insects
waterways
riparian vegetation
landscape structure
riparian areas
habitat
habitats
detectors
eclosion

Keywords

  • Bats
  • Channel confinement
  • Geomorphology
  • Insects
  • Riparian vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

@article{47669870f3eb4809a8fb7362873dd2c2,
title = "A landscape perspective on bat foraging ecology along rivers: Does channel confinement and insect availability influence the response of bats to aquatic resources in riverine landscapes?",
abstract = "River and riparian areas provide an important foraging habitat for insectivorous bats owing to high insect availability along waterways. However, structural characteristics of the riverine landscape may also influence the location of foraging bats. We used bat detectors to compare bat activity longitudinally along river reaches with contrasting channel confinement, ratio of valley floor width to active channel width, and riparian vegetation, and laterally with distance from the river along three different reach types. We measured rates of insect emergence from the river and aerial insect availability above the river and laterally up to 50-m into the riparian habitat in order to assess the relationship between food resources and insectivorous bat activity. Longitudinally, bat activity was concentrated along confined reaches in comparison to unconfined reaches but was not related to insect availability. Laterally, bats tracked exponential declines in aquatic insects with distance from the river. These data suggest that along the lateral dimension bats track food resources, but that along the longitudinal dimension channel shape and landscape structure determine bat distributions more than food resources.",
keywords = "Bats, Channel confinement, Geomorphology, Insects, Riparian vegetation",
author = "Hagen, {Elizabeth M.} and John Sabo",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1007/s00442-011-1913-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "166",
pages = "751--760",
journal = "Oecologia",
issn = "0029-8519",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A landscape perspective on bat foraging ecology along rivers

T2 - Does channel confinement and insect availability influence the response of bats to aquatic resources in riverine landscapes?

AU - Hagen, Elizabeth M.

AU - Sabo, John

PY - 2011/7/26

Y1 - 2011/7/26

N2 - River and riparian areas provide an important foraging habitat for insectivorous bats owing to high insect availability along waterways. However, structural characteristics of the riverine landscape may also influence the location of foraging bats. We used bat detectors to compare bat activity longitudinally along river reaches with contrasting channel confinement, ratio of valley floor width to active channel width, and riparian vegetation, and laterally with distance from the river along three different reach types. We measured rates of insect emergence from the river and aerial insect availability above the river and laterally up to 50-m into the riparian habitat in order to assess the relationship between food resources and insectivorous bat activity. Longitudinally, bat activity was concentrated along confined reaches in comparison to unconfined reaches but was not related to insect availability. Laterally, bats tracked exponential declines in aquatic insects with distance from the river. These data suggest that along the lateral dimension bats track food resources, but that along the longitudinal dimension channel shape and landscape structure determine bat distributions more than food resources.

AB - River and riparian areas provide an important foraging habitat for insectivorous bats owing to high insect availability along waterways. However, structural characteristics of the riverine landscape may also influence the location of foraging bats. We used bat detectors to compare bat activity longitudinally along river reaches with contrasting channel confinement, ratio of valley floor width to active channel width, and riparian vegetation, and laterally with distance from the river along three different reach types. We measured rates of insect emergence from the river and aerial insect availability above the river and laterally up to 50-m into the riparian habitat in order to assess the relationship between food resources and insectivorous bat activity. Longitudinally, bat activity was concentrated along confined reaches in comparison to unconfined reaches but was not related to insect availability. Laterally, bats tracked exponential declines in aquatic insects with distance from the river. These data suggest that along the lateral dimension bats track food resources, but that along the longitudinal dimension channel shape and landscape structure determine bat distributions more than food resources.

KW - Bats

KW - Channel confinement

KW - Geomorphology

KW - Insects

KW - Riparian vegetation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79958724620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79958724620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00442-011-1913-4

DO - 10.1007/s00442-011-1913-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 21274571

AN - SCOPUS:79958724620

VL - 166

SP - 751

EP - 760

JO - Oecologia

JF - Oecologia

SN - 0029-8519

IS - 3

ER -