A Gendered Lifestyle-Routine Activity Approach to Explaining Stalking Victimization in Canada

Bradford W. Reyns, Billy Henson, Bonnie S. Fisher, Kathleen Talbot, Matt R. Nobles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research into stalking victimization has proliferated over the last two decades, but several research questions related to victimization risk remain unanswered. Accordingly, the present study utilized a lifestyle-routine activity theoretical perspective to identify risk factors for victimization. Gender-based theoretical models also were estimated to assess the possible moderating effects of gender on the relationship between lifestyle-routine activity concepts and victimization risk. Based on an analysis of a representative sample of more than 15,000 residents of Canada from the Canadian General Social Survey (GSS), results suggested conditional support for lifestyle-routine activity theory and for the hypothesis that predictors of stalking victimization may be gender based.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1719-1743
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Canada
  • criminal harassment
  • routine activity theory
  • stalking
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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