A Framework for Explicating Formal Geometrical and Dimensional Tolerances Schema from Manufacturing Process Plans for Three-Dimensional Conformance Analysis

Payam Haghighi, Prashant Mohan, Jami J. Shah, Joseph K. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A process plan is an instruction set for the manufacture of parts generated from detailed design drawings or computer-aided design (CAD) models. While these plans are highly detailed about machines, tools, fixtures, and operation parameters, tolerances typically show up in less formal manner, if at all. It is not uncommon to see only dimensional plus/minus values on rough sketches accompanying the instructions. On the other hand, design drawings use standard geometrical and dimensional tolerances (GD&T) symbols with datums and datum reference frames (DRFs) clearly specified. This is not to say that process planners do not consider tolerances; they are implied by way of choices of fixtures, tools, machines, and operations. Process planners do tolerance charting in converting design tolerances to the manufacturing datum flow based on operation sequence, but the resulting plans cannot be audited for conformance to design specification. In this paper, we present a framework for explicating the GD&T schema implied by machining process plans. The first step is to derive DRFs from the fixturing method in each setup. Then, basic dimensions for features machined in the setup are determined with respect to the extracted DRF. Using shop data for the machines and operations involved, the range of possible geometric variations are estimated for each type (form, size, orientation, and position). The sequence of operations determines the datum flow chain. Once we have a formal manufacturing GD and T schema, we can analyze and compare it to design specification using the T-map math model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number021003
JournalJournal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Machine tools
Drawing (graphics)
Specifications
Computer aided design
Machining

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

A Framework for Explicating Formal Geometrical and Dimensional Tolerances Schema from Manufacturing Process Plans for Three-Dimensional Conformance Analysis. / Haghighi, Payam; Mohan, Prashant; Shah, Jami J.; Davidson, Joseph K.

In: Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering, Vol. 15, No. 2, 021003, 01.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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