A framework for environmental assessment of CO 2 capture and storage systems

Roger Sathre, Mikhail Chester, Jennifer Cain, Eric Masanet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly seen as a way for society to enjoy the benefits of fossil fuel energy sources while avoiding the climate disruption associated with fossil CO 2 emissions. A decision to deploy CCS technology at scale should be based on robust information on its overall costs and benefits. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a framework for holistic assessment of the energy and environmental footprint of a system, and can provide crucial information to policy-makers, scientists, and engineers as they develop and deploy CCS systems. We identify seven key issues that should be considered to ensure that conclusions and recommendations from CCS LCA are robust: energy penalty, functional units, scale-up challenges, non-climate environmental impacts, uncertainty management, policy-making needs, and market effects. Several recent life-cycle studies have focused on detailed assessments of individual CCS technologies and applications. While such studies provide important data and information on technology performance, such case-specific data are inadequate to fully inform the decision making process. LCA should aim to describe the system-wide environmental implications of CCS deployment at scale, rather than a narrow analysis of technological performance of individual power plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)540-548
Number of pages9
JournalEnergy
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Carbon dioxide
Life cycle
Fossil fuels
Environmental impact
Environmental assessments
Power plants
Decision making
Engineers
Costs

Keywords

  • Carbon capture and storage
  • Climate change mitigation
  • Environmental impacts
  • Life-cycle assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy(all)
  • Pollution

Cite this

A framework for environmental assessment of CO 2 capture and storage systems. / Sathre, Roger; Chester, Mikhail; Cain, Jennifer; Masanet, Eric.

In: Energy, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 540-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sathre, Roger ; Chester, Mikhail ; Cain, Jennifer ; Masanet, Eric. / A framework for environmental assessment of CO 2 capture and storage systems. In: Energy. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 540-548.
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