A formal framework for studying interaction in human-robot societies

Tathagata Chakraborti, Kartik Talamadupula, Yu Zhang, Subbarao Kambhampati

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As robots evolve into an integral part of the human ecosystem, humans and robots will be involved in a multitude of collaborative tasks that require complex coordination and cooperation. Indeed there has been extensive work in the robotics, planning as well as the human-robot interaction communities to understand and facilitate such seamless teaming. However, it has been argued that their increased participation as independent autonomous agents in hitherto human-habited environments has introduced many new challenges to the view of traditional human-robot teaming. When robots are deployed with independent and often self-sufficient tasks in a shared workspace, teams are often not formed explicitly and multiple teams cohabiting an environment interact more like colleagues rather than teammates. In this paper, we formalize these differences and analyze metrics to characterize autonomous behavior in such human-robot cohabitation settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWS-16-01
Subtitle of host publicationArtificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; WS-16-02: AI, Ethics, and Society; WS-16-03: Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security; WS-16-04: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings; WS-16-05: Beyond NP; WS-16-06: Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games; WS-16-07: Declarative Learning Based Programming; WS-16-08: Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI; WS-16-09: Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities; WS-16-10: Knowledge Extraction from Text; WS-16-11: Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; WS-16-12: Planning for Hybrid Systems; WS-16-13: Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; WS-16-14: Symbiotic Cognitive Systems; WS-16-15: World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence
PublisherAI Access Foundation
Pages737-741
Number of pages5
VolumeWS-16-01 - WS-16-15
ISBN (Electronic)9781577357599
StatePublished - 2016
Event30th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2016 - Phoenix, United States
Duration: Feb 12 2016Feb 17 2016

Other

Other30th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2016
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix
Period2/12/162/17/16

Fingerprint

Robots
Autonomous agents
Human robot interaction
Ecosystems
Robotics
Planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Chakraborti, T., Talamadupula, K., Zhang, Y., & Kambhampati, S. (2016). A formal framework for studying interaction in human-robot societies. In WS-16-01: Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; WS-16-02: AI, Ethics, and Society; WS-16-03: Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security; WS-16-04: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings; WS-16-05: Beyond NP; WS-16-06: Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games; WS-16-07: Declarative Learning Based Programming; WS-16-08: Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI; WS-16-09: Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities; WS-16-10: Knowledge Extraction from Text; WS-16-11: Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; WS-16-12: Planning for Hybrid Systems; WS-16-13: Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; WS-16-14: Symbiotic Cognitive Systems; WS-16-15: World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence (Vol. WS-16-01 - WS-16-15, pp. 737-741). AI Access Foundation.

A formal framework for studying interaction in human-robot societies. / Chakraborti, Tathagata; Talamadupula, Kartik; Zhang, Yu; Kambhampati, Subbarao.

WS-16-01: Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; WS-16-02: AI, Ethics, and Society; WS-16-03: Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security; WS-16-04: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings; WS-16-05: Beyond NP; WS-16-06: Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games; WS-16-07: Declarative Learning Based Programming; WS-16-08: Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI; WS-16-09: Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities; WS-16-10: Knowledge Extraction from Text; WS-16-11: Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; WS-16-12: Planning for Hybrid Systems; WS-16-13: Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; WS-16-14: Symbiotic Cognitive Systems; WS-16-15: World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence. Vol. WS-16-01 - WS-16-15 AI Access Foundation, 2016. p. 737-741.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chakraborti, T, Talamadupula, K, Zhang, Y & Kambhampati, S 2016, A formal framework for studying interaction in human-robot societies. in WS-16-01: Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; WS-16-02: AI, Ethics, and Society; WS-16-03: Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security; WS-16-04: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings; WS-16-05: Beyond NP; WS-16-06: Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games; WS-16-07: Declarative Learning Based Programming; WS-16-08: Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI; WS-16-09: Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities; WS-16-10: Knowledge Extraction from Text; WS-16-11: Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; WS-16-12: Planning for Hybrid Systems; WS-16-13: Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; WS-16-14: Symbiotic Cognitive Systems; WS-16-15: World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence. vol. WS-16-01 - WS-16-15, AI Access Foundation, pp. 737-741, 30th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2016, Phoenix, United States, 2/12/16.
Chakraborti T, Talamadupula K, Zhang Y, Kambhampati S. A formal framework for studying interaction in human-robot societies. In WS-16-01: Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; WS-16-02: AI, Ethics, and Society; WS-16-03: Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security; WS-16-04: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings; WS-16-05: Beyond NP; WS-16-06: Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games; WS-16-07: Declarative Learning Based Programming; WS-16-08: Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI; WS-16-09: Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities; WS-16-10: Knowledge Extraction from Text; WS-16-11: Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; WS-16-12: Planning for Hybrid Systems; WS-16-13: Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; WS-16-14: Symbiotic Cognitive Systems; WS-16-15: World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence. Vol. WS-16-01 - WS-16-15. AI Access Foundation. 2016. p. 737-741
Chakraborti, Tathagata ; Talamadupula, Kartik ; Zhang, Yu ; Kambhampati, Subbarao. / A formal framework for studying interaction in human-robot societies. WS-16-01: Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; WS-16-02: AI, Ethics, and Society; WS-16-03: Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security; WS-16-04: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings; WS-16-05: Beyond NP; WS-16-06: Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games; WS-16-07: Declarative Learning Based Programming; WS-16-08: Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI; WS-16-09: Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities; WS-16-10: Knowledge Extraction from Text; WS-16-11: Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; WS-16-12: Planning for Hybrid Systems; WS-16-13: Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; WS-16-14: Symbiotic Cognitive Systems; WS-16-15: World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence. Vol. WS-16-01 - WS-16-15 AI Access Foundation, 2016. pp. 737-741
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